Foods to avoid: Pizza

If you’ve had your gallbladder removed, eating pizza may not be right for you. Everyone loves pizza, but this same delicious food made of wonderful melted cheese can be a trigger to abdominal, chest and even back pain for people with no gallbladder.

Most gallbladder attacks and abdominal pains are triggered by fatty foods. Pizza contains high amounts of fat and cholesterol. All meat pizza with salami, pepperoni, ham, and bacon have the highest amount of fat compared to “lighter” forms of pizza. Yet, pizza in general should be avoided as this will cause heartburn and indigestion to most people without a gallbladder. The combined ingredients that are included in a pizza make it a deadly dose to those without a functioning gallbladder. The cheese, meat, and tomato salsa are especially high in fat and should be avoided at all costs.

A slice of pizza contains 10 grams of fat. Now imagine that with toppings. The fat will double or even triple. If you don’t have a gallbladder, eating pizza may increase your chances of developing indigestion because the distribution of bile may not be adequate enough to help digest your pizza.

The gallbladder has the important role of storing bile from the liver and releasing it when a person consumes fatty foods and other hard-to-digest meals. Without the gallbladder, your bile continuously flows from your liver to the intestine. Despite this, you may not have sufficient bile to digest certain foods. The gallbladder is very important as it is the organ that releases bile in adequate amounts, depending on the amount of fats ingested. The gallbladder regulates how much bile is needed and how much it should store. If you’ve had it removed, chances are you will have trouble digesting certain foods (pizza in this case).

When you eat pizza and have no gallbladder, you may develop heartburn and pain. Indigestion results due to inadequate bile. Heartburn follows because of the increased acid from the tomato sauce. Bloating may also occur. Indigestion also leaves food inside the stomach longer making stomach acids regurgitate to the esophagus in order to get rid of it. You may also feel some discomfort such as pain in your abdomen or a feeling of fullness.

Most discomfort following gallbladder removal is usually prevented through proper diet and medication. It would be a good choice to avoid from eating fatty foods like pizza to prevent indigestion.


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2 Responses to “Foods to avoid: Pizza”

  1. Hi there, You have done an excellent job. I’ll definitely digg it and personally recommend to my friends. I am confident they’ll be benefited from this site.

  2. Haley Marie90 says:

    can i eat any pizza on the fourth day after surgrey?

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